26
Dec

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Ham Radio, Uncategorized

Midland Land Mobile Model and Features Table
The Syntech I (AKA Syntech 1 or ST1) uses a “Z-273” module to hold the codeplug in a UV-erased PROM – i.e. the frequency and tone information. Changing anything requires erasing the PROM chip under a UV light and then reprogramming it with the 70-1000 stand-alone programmer, or the 70-1000c programmer which uses a PC to reprogram the eprom module. The Syntech II (AKA Syntech 2 or ST2) and XTR have a programming connector for programming by a PC using the the 70-1308A cable. The ST1s were made in the early 1980s… the XTR was the transition model between the I and the II, it and the ST2s came out in very late 80s/early 90s. The STI control head has blue pushbuttons, the ST2 head has white buttons. The newest models are the Bantam and Titan models. The Bantam radios are the smallest, programmed through the RJ-45 microphone connector with the 70-1309 programmer in line between the radio and a PC serial port. The Titan models are their current production units. The Securicor radios are Titans that were manufactured during the time Midland was owned by Securicor (Midland is now back under its own name).

Model Type Split Power Channel
Count Comments
Syntech I & 8 Channel
70-336 ST-1 150-174 35 watts 8 dash mount VHF
70-526 ST-1 470-470 25 watt 8 dash mount UHF

70-343* ST-1 150-174 20-40 watt 80 Marine use, dash mount
70-443* ST-1 150-174 20-40 watt 80 Marine use, trunk mount
70-343A* ST-1 150-174 1-25 watt 80 Marine use, dash mount
70-443A* ST-1 150-174 1-25 watt 80 Marine use, trunk mount
* These are type accepted for off shore and harbor use

70-050 ST-1 30-50 50 watt 80 Dash Mount low band
70-055 ST-1 30-50 50 watt 80 trunk mount low band
70-052 ST-1 30-50 50 watt 80 Dash Mount low band
70-056 ST-1 30-50 110 watt 80 trunk mount low band
“A”=29-37 MHz, “B”=35-44 MHz, “C”=40-54 MHz

70-066 ST1 66-80 MHz 40 watt 80 Dash Mount mid band
70-076 ST1 66-80 MHz 40 watt 80 Trunk Mount mid band
“A”=66-80 MHz, “B”=75-88 MHz

70-340 ST-1 136-174 40 watt 80 dash mount VHF
70-440 ST-1 136-174 40 watt 80 trunk mount VHF
70-342XL ST-1 136-174 40 watt 80 dash mount wide band VHF
70-442XL ST-1 136-174 40 watt 80 trunk mount wide band VHF
70-380 ST-1 136-174 80 watt 80 dash mount VHF
70-480 ST-1 136-174 80 watt 80 trunk mount VHF
70-382B ST-1 136-174 80 watt 80 dash mount wideband VHF*
70-482B ST-1 136-174 80 watt 80 trunk mount wideband VHF*
70-385 ST-1 136-174 110 watt 80 dash mount VHF
70-485 ST-1 136-174 110 watt 80 trunk mount VHF
“A”=136-156 MHz, “B”=148-174 MHz
The 70-382 and 70-482 radios are noted as “B” models because they were not available in A range.

70-530 ST-1 406-512 30watt 80 UHF Dash Mount
70-630 ST-1 406-512 30watt 80 UHF Trunk Mount
70-565 ST-1 406-512 65watt 80 UHF Dash Mount
70-665 ST-1 406-512 65watt 80 UHF Trunk Mount
“A”=406-430 MHz, “B”=450-470 MHz, “C”=470-494 MHz, “D”=494-512 MHz, “E”=430-450 MHz

Conventional 800 radios
70-915 ST-1 806-870 15watt 800 MHz Dash Mount
70-970 ST-1 806-870 15watt 800 MHz Trunk Mount
70-935 ST-1 806-870 35 watt 800 MHz Dash Mount
70-980 ST-1 806-870 35 watt 800 MHz Trunk Mount

Trunked 800 radios
70-9015 ST-1 806-870 15watt Dash Mount
70-9035 ST-1 806-870 30watt Dash Mount
70-9115 ST-1 806-870 15watt Trunk Mount
70-9135 ST-1 806-870 30watt Trunk Mount

Desktop Base Stations
70-058 ST-1 30-50 25-50 watts 80
70-840 ST-1 150-174 20-40 watts 80
70-842XL ST-1 150-174 20-40 watts 80
70-930 ST-1 450-470 15-30 watts 80
70-908 ST-1 806-870 >5-15 watts 80
70-909 ST-1 806-870 20-53 watts 80

Table Top Repeaters
70-805b ST-1 150-174 2-5 watts
70-834b ST-1 150-174 5-35 watt
70-905b ST-1 450-470 2-5 watts
70-924b ST-1 450-470 5-25 watts

XTR & 8 Channel
70-0351A XTR 30-36 60 W 22 Dash Mount
70-0351B XTR 36-42 60 W 22 Dash Mount
70-0351C XTR 42-50 60 W 22 Dash Mount
70-0355A XTR 30-36 60 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-0355B XTR 36-42 60 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-0355C XTR 42-50 60 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-0371A XTR 30-36 110 W 22 Dash Mount
70-0371B XTR 36-42 110 W 22 Dash Mount
70-0371B XTR 36-42 110 W 22 Dash Mount
70-0371C XTR 42-50 110 W 22 Dash Mount
70-0375A XTR 30-36 110 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-0375B XTR 36-42 110 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-0375C XTR 42-50 110 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-1066A 66-77 30 W 8 Dash Mount
70-1066B 77-88 30 W 8 Dash Mount
70-1070A XTR 66-77 40 W 22 Dash Mount
70-1070B XTR 77-88 40 W 22 Dash Mount
70-1075A XTR 66-77 40 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-1075B XTR 77-88 40 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-1336A 136-160 25W 8 Dash Mount
70-1336B 150-174 30 W 8 Dash Mount
70-1340A XTR 136-160 40 W 22 Dash Mount
70-1340B XTR 150-174 40 W 22 Dash Mount
70-1342A XTR 136-162 40 W 22 Dash Mount
70-1342B XTR 148-174 40 W 22 Dash Mount
70-1395A XTR 136-160 110 W 22 Dash Mount
70-1395B XTR 150-174 110 W 22 Dash Mount
70-1440A XTR 136-160 40 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-1440B XTR 150-160 40 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-1442A XTR 136-162 40 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-1442B XTR 148-174 40 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-1495A XTR 136-160 110 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-1495B XTR 150-174 110 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-1526A 403-430 25W 8 Dash Mount
70-1526B 450-470 25W 8 Dash Mount
70-1530A XTR 403-430 30 W 22 Dash Mount
70-1530B XTR 450-470 30 W 22 Dash Mount
70-1530C XTR 470-500 30 W 22 Dash Mount
70-1530D XTR 490-520 30 W 22 Dash Mount
70-1532A XTR 403-430 30 W 22 Dash Mount
70-1532B XTR 450-470 30 W 22 Dash Mount
70-1595A XTR 403-430 100W 22 Dash Mount
70-1595B XTR 450-470 100W 22 Dash Mount
70-1630A XTR 403-430 30 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-1630B XTR 450-470 30 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-1630C XTR 470-500 30 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-1630D XTR 490-520 30 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-1632A XTR 403-430 30 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-1632B XTR 450-470 30 W 22 Trunk Mount
70-1695A XTR 403-430 100W 22 Dash Mount
70-1695B XTR 450-470 100W 22 Dash Mount
70-9020 806-870 15W 200 LTR Trunked
70-9160 XTR 806-870 35W 22 Conventional
70-9170 806-870 15W 8 Conventional
70-9170 806-870 5W 8 Conventional
70-9180 XTR 806-870 35W 22 Conventional

Syntech 2 Low Band
70-0501 ST-2 30-54 50watt 320 dash mount
70-0502 ST-2 30-54 50watt 320 dash mount w/deluxe head
70-0551 ST-2 30-54 50watt 320 trunk mount
70-0552 ST-2 30-54 50watt 320 trunk mount w/deluxe head
70-0557 ST-2 30-54 50watt 320 trunk mount w/small head
70-0521 ST-2 30-54 110watt 320 dash mount
70-0522 ST-2 30-54 110watt 320 dash mount w/deluxe head
70-0561 ST-2 30-54 110watt 320 trunk mount
70-0562 ST-2 30-54 110watt 320 trunk mount w/deluxe head
70-0567 ST-2 30-54 110watt 320 trunk mount w/small head
“A”=30-36 MHz, “B”=36-42 MHz, “C”=42-50 MHz
CWB indicates 11 MHz T & R
The deluxe head has an LCD display

Syntech 2 VHF (wideband, 24 MHz)
70-3421 ST-2 136-174 40 watt 320 dash mount
70-3422 ST-2 136-174 40 watt 320 dash mount deluxe head
70-4421 ST-2 136-174 40 watt 320 trunk mount
70-4422 ST-2 136-174 40 watt 320 trunk mount deluxe head
70-4427 ST-2 136-174 40 watt 320 trunk mount small head
70-3851 ST-2 136-174 110watt 320 dash mount
70-3852 ST-2 136-174 110watt 320 dash mount deluxe head
70-4851 ST-2 136-174 110watt 320 trunk mount
70-4852 ST-2 136-174 110watt 320 trunk mount deluxe head
70-4857 ST-2 136-174 110 watt 320 trunk mount small head
“A”=136-160 MHz, “B”=150-174 MHz

Syntech 2 UHF
70-5301 ST-2 406-470 30 watt 320 dash mount wideband 24 MHz T & R
70-5302 ST-2 406-470 30 watt 320 dash mount wideband 24 MHz T & R, deluxe head
70-6301 ST-2 406-470 30 watt 320 trunk mount wideband
70-6302 ST-2 406-470 30 watt 320 trunk mount wideband, deluxe head
70-6307 ST-2 406-470 30 watt 320 trunk mount wideband, small head
“A”=406-430 MHz, “B”=450-470 MHz

Continuous duty repeaters
70-0700 ST-2 148-174 45-70 watts VHF
70-1500 ST-2 148-174 100-150 watts VHF
70-2500 ST-2 148-174 250 watts VHF
70-4050 ST-2 450-512 30-50 watt UHF
70-4120 ST-2 450-512 90-120 watts UHF
70-8030 ST-2 806-870 30 watt 800 MHz
70-8100 ST-2 806-870 100 watt 800 MHz

24
Dec

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Ham Radio

Try the region hack:


Regedit – open up HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE -> SOFTWARE -> Motorola -> ProRadio -> FSK and edit the string called “SerializedString” and replace it’s data with @%&MAHUS (was UHM@)

then start up CPS. This removes the region restrictions

17
Dec

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Linux/Hosting

Renewing a Self-signed cert on Centos

Started getting a warning email every day..

################# SSL Certificate Warning ################

Certificate for hostname ‘webhost’, in file (or by nickname):
/etc/pki/tls/certs/localhost.crt

The certificate needs to be renewed; this can be done
using the ‘genkey’ program.

Browsers will not be able to correctly connect to this
web site using SSL until the certificate is renewed.

##########################################################
Generated by certwatch(1)

Command to run for this is:

openssl req -new -days 365 -x509 -nodes -out /etc/pki/tls/certs/localhost.crt -keyout /etc/pki/tls/private/localhost.key

Then need to restart apache

systemctl restart httpd

And, we’re done!

19
Oct

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Tech

Dell manufactured two generations of the PowerEdge R710 server model and therefore two different revisions of the PowerEdge R710 system board. It is important to understand the differences between the system boards prior to upgrading or replacing system components.

All system boards support either PC3-8500 (1066MHz) or PC3-10600 (1333MHz) DDR3 memory DIMMS. All system boards feature eighteen (18) slots; nine (9) for each processorand will accommodate up for a maximum of 288GB of RAM.

Generation I system boards (motherboards) support Intel Xeon 5500/5600 series dual and quad-core processors up to 95W. They will NOT work with any of the quad or six-core 130W CPUs in the Intel Xeon X5600 series. Part numbers for generation I system boards include YDJK3N047H7THW3, VWN1R and 0W9X3.

Generation II system boards added support for Intel Xeon X5600 series 130W processors such as the X5680 and X5690 CPUs. If the front of your PowerEdge R710 has a Roman numeral “II”, it likely has a generation II system board. Part numbers for generation II system boards include XDX060NH4P and YMXG9.

 

My R710s, I have motherboards:

2G7C1L1  Ship date: November 18, 2009  Motherboard 0W9X3 Gen1
5XWYLL1  Ship date: March 03, 2010  Motherboard YDJK3 Gen1
B9T8FP1  Ship date: January 04, 2011  Motherboard NNTTH Gen1
4S361Q1  Ship date: February 18, 2011  Motherboard XDX06 Gen2
6
Oct

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Fixing broken stuff, Restorations

Hi, I’m Rob, and I’m a hoarder collector

I have a lot of batteries.

Sealed lead acid, AGM, Gel, Lipo, Li-ion

The things they all have in common:

Needed to keep things running

Not cheap

Harder to test

They don’t come with a gas gauge (usually)

Batteries are rated in mAh, of Ah  and voltage.   For the sake of this post, we’ll be dealing with only 12v batteries, like a car battery, but not.

Formula is (mAh)*(V)/1000 = (Wh). For example, if you have a 300mAh battery rated at 5V, the power is 300mAh * 5V / 1000 = 1.5Wh.

In TODAY’S case:

I have a 26000mAh battery rated at 12V, the power is 26000mAh * 12V / 1000 = 312Wh.

But how does one tell if its ACTUALLY 312Wh, or 31 Wh?

My testing process:

*disclaimer*

MY testing process will just be “good enough”  I don’t work for NASA building things that go into space.  I just need to be “close”


Step 1:  Charge the battery till complete with my CTEK 25000 12V 25Amp Battery Charger

 

 

This process allows me to remove the bottom of the barrel packs right away – If the CTEK can’t charge it, it goes to the recycle pile, quick and easy.  If the get the green light from the CTEK, we move on to step 2

 

Step2: Build a load.

For my load, I’m using a 400 watt inexpensive 120v power converter.  I’m looking to waste as much power as I can, so it doesn’t need to be pretty.  Today, I have a pair of lights plugged into the inverter.  This load is about 12v @ 6amp, which seems to work pretty well..

 

Now, the gas gauge for this project: Power Analyzer

The link isn’t exactly the same model, I have several, and they all seem to work about the same, and look the same.

Step3: Test.

I connect the meter to the battery (source)

Connect the inverter load to (load)

Turn on the inverter power switch.

Wait.

You’ll have to excuse the scribble that is my handwriting, but the key part is to note the results on the pack

As you can see, the first 3 packs differ greatly.

 

 

 

 

Glad I only have 10 to do, these can take from 2 mins, all the way to an hour each.

Battery # AmpHour WattHour Rated Wh % of Capacity
1 0.00 0.00 312 0.00%
2 0.00 0.00 312 0.00%
9 0.00 0.00 312 0.00%
3 0.50 4.90 312 1.57%
4 1.12 13.38 312 4.29%
5 3.90 47.00 312 15.06%
6 4.94 59.30 312 19.01%
10 6.27 68.60 312 21.99%
7 19.16 210.00 312 67.31%
8 19.40 232.00 312 74.36%

 

Step4: Remove the known bads, recharge the possible goods

 

Back to the CTEK 25000

 

Step5: Retest

 

Step6: Determine a threshold

I’m choosing 65%, but we’ll see.

 

14
Jun

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Linux/Hosting

In a recent trip down the rabbit hole, I started evaluating various site security products for some of the wordpress sites that I run or manage.  Moral to the story, if you ask questions, you’re going to sign up for more work when you hear the answers, but I guess thats ok….

I had recently switched everything to SSL served, after reading https://fourdots.com/blog/why-you-need-ssl-to-rank-better-in-2016-and-how-to-set-it-2169 , but failed to take note of the SSL settings on my server.

My default settings were “secure” but allowed several technologies that have proven exploits. Largest issues were TLS 1.0 and TLS 1.1, and RC4 Cipher.

This host is a Centos 7.x host, with apache vhosts. Try as I might to edit the SSL settings in the vhost, I still had less than stellar reports.

It seems that apache loads /etc/httpd/conf.d/ssl.conf before the *.vhosts, so whatever is set in that file, ends up being the global setting everyone sticks to.

Go test yours! https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest/index.html

I’m currently using:

SSLProtocol TLSv1.2

SSLCipherSuite HIGH:MEDIUM:!aNULL:!MD5:!SEED:!IDEA:!RC4

as my settings in the file, and the security scans now seem to be A/95%, which was my goal, I guess

 

 

 

 

 

 

22
Apr

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Linux/Hosting

The Problem

In the past 30 days, I’ve seen over 140,000 entries from many unique ips, which looks like either DOS or password hacking bots, annoying, especially since all my passwords are at least 12 char, random.

 

Top 10 Values Count %
162.17.140.61 8,259 5.844%
212.237.47.114 4,583 3.243%
185.227.108.10 1,560 1.104%
192.154.213.123 1,434 1.015%
110.87.25.235 1,356 0.96%
120.35.102.81 1,356 0.96%
117.69.231.207 1,332 0.942%
183.164.244.109 1,327 0.939%
117.69.230.159 1,297 0.918%
117.69.230.216 1,288 0.911%

 

In /var/log/maillog

Apr 22 07:43:21 webhost postfix/smtpd[12521]: lost connection after AUTH from unknown[114.237.43.12]
Apr 22 07:43:19 webhost postfix/smtpd[12521]: lost connection after AUTH from unknown[114.237.43.12]
Apr 22 07:43:17 webhost postfix/smtpd[12521]: lost connection after AUTH from unknown[114.237.43.12]
Apr 22 07:43:14 webhost postfix/smtpd[12521]: lost connection after AUTH from unknown[114.237.43.12]
Apr 22 07:43:08 webhost postfix/smtpd[12521]: lost connection after AUTH from unknown[114.237.43.12]
Apr 22 07:43:06 webhost postfix/smtpd[12521]: lost connection after AUTH from unknown[114.237.43.12]
Apr 22 07:04:24 webhost postfix/smtpd[29802]: lost connection after HELO from unknown[119.86.182.130]
Apr 22 06:35:16 webhost postfix/smtpd[18488]: lost connection after UNKNOWN from unknown[93.174.93.46]

The Fix

Add to /etc/fail2ban/jail.local:

[postfix-auth]
enabled = true
filter = postfix.auth
action = iptables-multiport[name=postfix, port=”http,https,smtp,submission,pop3,pop3s,imap,imaps,sieve”, protocol=tcp]
# sendmail[name=Postfix, dest=you@mail.com]
logpath = /var/log/maillog
bantime = 21600
maxretry = 3

Create /etc/fail2ban/filter.d/postfix.auth.conf

[Definition]
failregex = lost connection after AUTH from (.*)\[\]
ignoreregex =

Problem Solved!

20
Apr

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Arcade Video Games

Finally got around to picking up one of these gears and getting it swapped out on my 1981 Star Wars arcade machine.  Orig being plastic over alum, new being all cnc alum.

 

16
Mar

   Posted by: RobPatton   in RC Planes/Helicopters

A while back, gosh, its been 10 months already, my how time flies.    I picked up the Horizon Hobby 2.1 m Carbon-Z Cessna 150 Horizon 2.1 meter Cessna 150 Carbon-Z.  I grew up in a 1966 Cessna 150 N3983J, and despite it being red vs blue, it holds a place in my heart.   It flies AMAZING. So slow you would think it should fall out of the air.

Turns out they had a special if you bought the Cessna, you could get a free set of floats.   After much fighting with Horizon, I got my floats today!

 

 

7
Mar

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Restorations

 

After all these years, its almost back to its 1982 glory. Beach board, ACS-651 trucks, Road Rider 6 wheels, Road Rider riser pads. All I need is some NOS German Speed bearings, and some Lightning bolt grip tape..