19
Oct

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Tech

Dell manufactured two generations of the PowerEdge R710 server model and therefore two different revisions of the PowerEdge R710 system board. It is important to understand the differences between the system boards prior to upgrading or replacing system components.

All system boards support either PC3-8500 (1066MHz) or PC3-10600 (1333MHz) DDR3 memory DIMMS. All system boards feature eighteen (18) slots; nine (9) for each processorand will accommodate up for a maximum of 288GB of RAM.

Generation I system boards (motherboards) support Intel Xeon 5500/5600 series dual and quad-core processors up to 95W. They will NOT work with any of the quad or six-core 130W CPUs in the Intel Xeon X5600 series. Part numbers for generation I system boards include YDJK3N047H7THW3, VWN1R and 0W9X3.

Generation II system boards added support for Intel Xeon X5600 series 130W processors such as the X5680 and X5690 CPUs. If the front of your PowerEdge R710 has a Roman numeral “II”, it likely has a generation II system board. Part numbers for generation II system boards include XDX060NH4P and YMXG9.

 

My R710s, I have motherboards:

2G7C1L1  Ship date: November 18, 2009  Motherboard 0W9X3 Gen1
5XWYLL1  Ship date: March 03, 2010  Motherboard YDJK3 Gen1
B9T8FP1  Ship date: January 04, 2011  Motherboard NNTTH Gen1
4S361Q1  Ship date: February 18, 2011  Motherboard XDX06 Gen2
6
Oct

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Fixing broken stuff, Restorations

Hi, I’m Rob, and I’m a hoarder collector

I have a lot of batteries.

Sealed lead acid, AGM, Gel, Lipo, Li-ion

The things they all have in common:

Needed to keep things running

Not cheap

Harder to test

They don’t come with a gas gauge (usually)

Batteries are rated in mAh, of Ah  and voltage.   For the sake of this post, we’ll be dealing with only 12v batteries, like a car battery, but not.

Formula is (mAh)*(V)/1000 = (Wh). For example, if you have a 300mAh battery rated at 5V, the power is 300mAh * 5V / 1000 = 1.5Wh.

In TODAY’S case:

I have a 26000mAh battery rated at 12V, the power is 26000mAh * 12V / 1000 = 312Wh.

But how does one tell if its ACTUALLY 312Wh, or 31 Wh?

My testing process:

*disclaimer*

MY testing process will just be “good enough”  I don’t work for NASA building things that go into space.  I just need to be “close”


Step 1:  Charge the battery till complete with my CTEK 25000 12V 25Amp Battery Charger

 

 

This process allows me to remove the bottom of the barrel packs right away – If the CTEK can’t charge it, it goes to the recycle pile, quick and easy.  If the get the green light from the CTEK, we move on to step 2

 

Step2: Build a load.

For my load, I’m using a 400 watt inexpensive 120v power converter.  I’m looking to waste as much power as I can, so it doesn’t need to be pretty.  Today, I have a pair of lights plugged into the inverter.  This load is about 12v @ 6amp, which seems to work pretty well..

 

Now, the gas gauge for this project: Power Analyzer

The link isn’t exactly the same model, I have several, and they all seem to work about the same, and look the same.

Step3: Test.

I connect the meter to the battery (source)

Connect the inverter load to (load)

Turn on the inverter power switch.

Wait.

You’ll have to excuse the scribble that is my handwriting, but the key part is to note the results on the pack

As you can see, the first 3 packs differ greatly.

 

 

 

 

Glad I only have 10 to do, these can take from 2 mins, all the way to an hour each.

Battery # AmpHour WattHour Rated Wh % of Capacity
1 0.00 0.00 312 0.00%
2 0.00 0.00 312 0.00%
9 0.00 0.00 312 0.00%
3 0.50 4.90 312 1.57%
4 1.12 13.38 312 4.29%
5 3.90 47.00 312 15.06%
6 4.94 59.30 312 19.01%
10 6.27 68.60 312 21.99%
7 19.16 210.00 312 67.31%
8 19.40 232.00 312 74.36%

 

Step4: Remove the known bads, recharge the possible goods

 

Back to the CTEK 25000

 

Step5: Retest

 

Step6: Determine a threshold

I’m choosing 65%, but we’ll see.

 

14
Jun

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Linux/Hosting

In a recent trip down the rabbit hole, I started evaluating various site security products for some of the wordpress sites that I run or manage.  Moral to the story, if you ask questions, you’re going to sign up for more work when you hear the answers, but I guess thats ok….

I had recently switched everything to SSL served, after reading https://fourdots.com/blog/why-you-need-ssl-to-rank-better-in-2016-and-how-to-set-it-2169 , but failed to take note of the SSL settings on my server.

My default settings were “secure” but allowed several technologies that have proven exploits. Largest issues were TLS 1.0 and TLS 1.1, and RC4 Cipher.

This host is a Centos 7.x host, with apache vhosts. Try as I might to edit the SSL settings in the vhost, I still had less than stellar reports.

It seems that apache loads /etc/httpd/conf.d/ssl.conf before the *.vhosts, so whatever is set in that file, ends up being the global setting everyone sticks to.

Go test yours! https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest/index.html

I’m currently using:

SSLProtocol TLSv1.2

SSLCipherSuite HIGH:MEDIUM:!aNULL:!MD5:!SEED:!IDEA:!RC4

as my settings in the file, and the security scans now seem to be A/95%, which was my goal, I guess

 

 

 

 

 

 

22
Apr

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Linux/Hosting

The Problem

In the past 30 days, I’ve seen over 140,000 entries from many unique ips, which looks like either DOS or password hacking bots, annoying, especially since all my passwords are at least 12 char, random.

 

Top 10 Values Count %
162.17.140.61 8,259 5.844%
212.237.47.114 4,583 3.243%
185.227.108.10 1,560 1.104%
192.154.213.123 1,434 1.015%
110.87.25.235 1,356 0.96%
120.35.102.81 1,356 0.96%
117.69.231.207 1,332 0.942%
183.164.244.109 1,327 0.939%
117.69.230.159 1,297 0.918%
117.69.230.216 1,288 0.911%

 

In /var/log/maillog

Apr 22 07:43:21 webhost postfix/smtpd[12521]: lost connection after AUTH from unknown[114.237.43.12]
Apr 22 07:43:19 webhost postfix/smtpd[12521]: lost connection after AUTH from unknown[114.237.43.12]
Apr 22 07:43:17 webhost postfix/smtpd[12521]: lost connection after AUTH from unknown[114.237.43.12]
Apr 22 07:43:14 webhost postfix/smtpd[12521]: lost connection after AUTH from unknown[114.237.43.12]
Apr 22 07:43:08 webhost postfix/smtpd[12521]: lost connection after AUTH from unknown[114.237.43.12]
Apr 22 07:43:06 webhost postfix/smtpd[12521]: lost connection after AUTH from unknown[114.237.43.12]
Apr 22 07:04:24 webhost postfix/smtpd[29802]: lost connection after HELO from unknown[119.86.182.130]
Apr 22 06:35:16 webhost postfix/smtpd[18488]: lost connection after UNKNOWN from unknown[93.174.93.46]

The Fix

Add to /etc/fail2ban/jail.local:

[postfix-auth]
enabled = true
filter = postfix.auth
action = iptables-multiport[name=postfix, port=”http,https,smtp,submission,pop3,pop3s,imap,imaps,sieve”, protocol=tcp]
# sendmail[name=Postfix, dest=you@mail.com]
logpath = /var/log/maillog
bantime = 21600
maxretry = 3

Create /etc/fail2ban/filter.d/postfix.auth.conf

[Definition]
failregex = lost connection after AUTH from (.*)\[\]
ignoreregex =

Problem Solved!

20
Apr

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Arcade Video Games

Finally got around to picking up one of these gears and getting it swapped out on my 1981 Star Wars arcade machine.  Orig being plastic over alum, new being all cnc alum.

 

16
Mar

   Posted by: RobPatton   in RC Planes/Helicopters

A while back, gosh, its been 10 months already, my how time flies.    I picked up the Horizon Hobby 2.1 m Carbon-Z Cessna 150 Horizon 2.1 meter Cessna 150 Carbon-Z.  I grew up in a 1966 Cessna 150 N3983J, and despite it being red vs blue, it holds a place in my heart.   It flies AMAZING. So slow you would think it should fall out of the air.

Turns out they had a special if you bought the Cessna, you could get a free set of floats.   After much fighting with Horizon, I got my floats today!

 

 

7
Mar

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Restorations

 

After all these years, its almost back to its 1982 glory. Beach board, ACS-651 trucks, Road Rider 6 wheels, Road Rider riser pads. All I need is some NOS German Speed bearings, and some Lightning bolt grip tape..

6
Mar

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Food!

PurpleCarrotLogo

3
Mar

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Ham Radio

After 6 months of sitting on the shelf, @KC4HAD convinced me to sit down and make this thing work.

openSPOT is a standalone digital radio IP gateway / hotspot

Key features:

  • Supports DMR (Brandmeister, DMRplus), D-Star (DCS, REF/DPlus, XRF/DExtra, XLX), System Fusion (FCS, YSFReflector) networks. More supported networks and features will be available with new firmware releases.
  • Supports cross modem modes. Talk with your C4FM radio on DMR, and with your DMR radio on System Fusion networks!
  • Very easy to use, works without a computer. No additional hardware required, works out of the box. All accessories included.
  • Web interface for configuration and monitoring.
  • HTTP, UDP/TCP API support.
  • Custom 2FSK/4FSK RF protocol support with TDMA.
  • USB powered, low energy consumption, 20mW RF output.
  • Create your own private radio network using our open source server application.
  • Runs fully embedded software written in pure C, running on an embedded real time operating system. No Linux, bulky Windows software or failing SD cards

 

One of the most interesting parts of this (for me) is getting a current status log, with user info, etc.  Kinda fun..

21
Feb

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Ham Radio

Was having quite an issue finding the correct software for my Hytera PD362.

 

Finally!  http://gigaparts.net/downloads/    gigaparts seems to be the local dealer for the ham line of radios, and offers this stuff for download

CPS 205.03.002 NA2  is what worked for me, After a quick run in with a “fake” prolific chips programming cable, I can at least read the radio!