Archive for the ‘Money’ Category

18
Jun

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Money, Precious Metals

ALL S MINT COINS-  S mint coins were proofs to begin with and are very rarely in circulation

Pennies

1908 or earlier
1909-1958 Wheat pennies Many errors in this list
1960,1970S small date
1960 Large date over small date
1960D D over D small over large date
1969D no initials
1969S, 1971, 1971S, 1972, 1983, 1995 Double Die
1984 Double Ear
1992, 1992D, 1998S, 1999S Close AM
1996, 1998, 1999, 2000 Wide AM
2009 Lincoln back

Nickels
1937 or earlier
1939 Doubled Monticello
1942-1945 War nickels
1943 3 over 2
1949D, 1955 D over S 1950D
1954S S over D
1994P, 1997P Matte proof
2009 (very low mintage)

Dimes
1945 or earlier
1946-1964 Silver coinage
1982 No mint mark
1996W
2009 (very low mintage)

Quarter
1930 or earlier (nothing during 1931) Silver coinage
1932-1964 Also silver coinage
1937, 1942D, 1943, 1943S Double Die
1950D D over S
1950S S over D
Wisconsin Quarter extra leaf
Turned Die State Quarter

Half Dollars
1970 and earlier
1974D Double Die
1987 (both P and D)

 

Canadian Coins

Pennies
1955 No Shoulder Fold
1962 Double Date
1964 Missing MG, Missing G, or Extra Spine
1965 Pointed 5
1967, 1978 Double Date
1983 Near beads
1985 Pointed 5
2006 Magnetic No logo/No P

Nickels
1858-1919 Silver coinage
1953 Many different errors, best to keep any
1954 Missing Chrome
1957 Bug Tail
1958, 1962 Double date
1964 Extra water line or “spitting queen”
1965 Large beads
1980 Double Date

Dimes
1858-1967 Silver coinage
1969 Large date

Quarter
1908-1967 Silver coinage
1973 Large bust
1973 Mountie
1991 Low mintage (>500k)
1992,1999 Other than Caribou
2000 January die rotation

Half Dollars
1908-1967 Silver coinage
1974 Missing S
1978 Round jewels
1982 Small beads

Dollars
1935-1967 Silver coinage
1968 DHL #1
1974 Double yoke
1982 Constitution (certain configurations)

12
Sep

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Life Stuff, Money

  1. “Beware of little expenses; a small leak will sink a great ship.” – Benjamin Franklin
  2. “He who does not economize will have to agonize.” – Confucius
  3. “The safe way to double your money is to fold it over once and put it in your pocket.” – Frank McKinney Hubbard
  4. “By sowing frugality we reap liberty, a golden harvest.” – Agesilaus
  5. “Without frugality none can be rich, and with it very few would be poor.” – Samuel Johnson
  6. “The way to wealth depends on just two words, industry and frugality.” – Benjamin Franklin
  7. “Too many people spend money they haven’t earned, to buy things they don’t want, to impress people they don’t like.” – Will Rogers
  8. “We make ourselves rich by making our wants few.” — Henry David Thoreau
  9. “Frugality is one of the most beautiful and joyful words in the English language, and yet one that we are culturally cut off from understanding and enjoying. The consumption society has made us feel that happiness lies in having things, and has failed to teach us the happiness of not having things.” – Elise Boulding
  10. “If you realize that you have enough, you are truly rich.” – Lao Tzu
5
Jul

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Just plain weird, Money

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A rallying cry can be heard across the country, from the swanky streets of SoHo to the tiny town of Randolph, Kan.: “Save Our Post Office!” As the United States Postal Service, weighed down by a crippling multibillion-dollar deficit, shrinks down its operations, post offices across the country are on the chopping block. Each year, hundreds of postal operations shutter, but this coming fall could be the single biggest consolidation in USPS history. Over the next three months, more than 3,200 post offices and retail outlets—out of 34,000—will be reviewed for possible closure or consolidation.

Downsizing is a business imperative, says Linda Welch, acting vice president of delivery and post office operations at the USPS. “Revenues have declined, and mail volume continues to decline,” she says. Not only have e-mail and electronic bill paying made for a skinnier mail stream, but the recession has caused a sharp pullback in advertising mail that has hurt the Postal Service even more. In March, Postmaster General John Potter asked Congress for the right to reduce the mail week from six days to five, for a savings of $3.5 billion. Shutting down post offices will have similar cost-saving effects. And most Americans say they’re OK with the cutbacks, as long as they’re not paying more to send mail. A recent USA Today/Gallup Poll revealed that more Americans would rather the Postal Service curtail services than seek a bailout or raise stamp prices.

At least, that’s what everyone says—until it’s their beloved post office at stake. For various reasons, people tend to react with great fervor when their local offices are endangered.

Consider the case of the Hawleyville Post Office. After years of negotiations, this past January, the Postal Service notified the Connecticut community that its 166-year-old post office would officially close on Feb. 14. An article in the local newspaper poignantly noted, “The long love affair between the Hawleyville post office and its loyal customers will come to an end on—of all days—Valentine’s Day.” Its post office was rickety, but the small community embraced it as a gathering place. One resident told the Newtown Bee, “The Hawleyville Post Office is like Cheers in Hawleyville.” In fear of losing its precious haunt, the Hawleyville community mobilized. A Web site was created. A petition was circulated. They got Congress involved. And lo and behold, the community won approval for a new post office, to be opened this summer.

Every time a post office is slated for closure or consolidation, the Postal Service is legally obligated to inform its customers well in advance. “There’s a very long process that they have to go through,” says Mario Principe, the post office continuance consultant at the National League of Postmasters. That gives the communities plenty of time-usually at least two months-to stage a rescue.

The Postal Service will typically send out a survey or host a town hall meeting before an endangered office closes. Perhaps the closing of a post office means too many lost jobs for an already hurting community. The office might house the bulletin board that posts important community announcements. Or the next-closest post office may be really far away. If customers alert officials to such concerns, there’s a better chance that their office will be spared. Appealing the closure decision to the Postal Regulatory Commission often works, too—but it’s a step that many communities don’t know to take.

t’s also important to check out why a post office is on the chopping block in the first place. Those under review this summer are mostly metropolitan branches or stations. But in the case of small post offices, federal law states that the reason can’t be just that the office isn’t bringing in enough revenue. If that’s the only explanation given, then the Postal Service can’t legally shut it down.

Often times, post offices face closure because their leases expire. That’s the case in Deer Harbor, Wash. After failed attempts to find a new location for the post office, the community decided “in desperation” to buy its property just to keep it in business. If it can raise the $250,000 purchase price by the end of this month, the Postal Service has agreed to continue operations there.

The Postal Service seems willing to negotiate, and it’s not really bothered by the protests. “It actually it makes us very proud to know that we are a valuable member of the community,” says Welch. She says that the USPS appreciates the great lengths that some communities will go to just to ensure that their services can continue. What the Postal Service would appreciate even more? If those people would show their appreciation by taking the simple step of sending more mail. Oddly enough, that seems to be the unthinkable last resort.

25
Apr

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Humor, Money, Precious Metals

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A person I work with decided it would be funny to pay me a small debt, in pennies, unrolled pennies. Little did he realize, that I just love coins.  So I spent about 30 mins of my saturday to sort and roll them.Things to keep in mind.1. Pennies 1981 and older, are 95% copper, after 81, they are about 5% copper.  Pre 82 pennies are worth more in copper, than the penny is worth.2. Wheat Pennies were made 1958 and before.3. Canadian pennies are worth nothing, really.

What I found was this. Of the 1000 pennies:

1958 and prior:      13      1.3%

1981 and prior:    748     74.8%

1982 and newer:   230    23%

Canadian:                 5       .5%

27
Mar

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Money

I thought this was interesting. I looked in the grocery store and the bread wrappers do have different colored twist ties, and even the ones with the plastic clips have different colors. You learn something new everyday!!

When you go to buy bread in the grocery store, have you ever wondered which is the freshest, so you “squeeze” for freshness or softness.

Did you know that bread is delivered fresh to the stores five days a week? Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday. And each day has a different color twist tie. They are:

Monday – Blue
Tuesday – Green
Thursday – Red
Friday – White
Saturday – Yellow

So today being Thursday, I wanted a red twist tie – not white which is Friday (almost a week old?)

The colors go alphabetically by color Blue – Green – Red – White – Yellow, Monday thru Saturday. Very easy to remember. But I put a post-it note in my wallet when I first found out about this so I would not forget.

Enjoy fresh bread when you buy bread with the right color on the day you are shopping.

25
Feb

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Money

De Beers has temporarily shut down its diamond mines in Botswana due to low demand for the precious stones, the Telegraph reports. The firm’s Botswana mines account for half of De Beers’ output, and about a fifth of diamond production worldwide.

De Beers was not able to sell a single diamond from Botswana in November and sold only very few in the two months after. Of the four mines operated by Debswana, a joint venture between De Beers and the Botswana government, two will suspend work through the year. Two others, including Jwaneng, the world’s most-valuable diamond mine, could continue production in mid-April.

De Beers noted that the last time it had suspended operations completely at any mine was during the Great Depression.

21
Nov

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Food!, Money

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LOS ANGELES – Dr Pepper is making good on its promise of free soda now that the release of Guns N’ Roses’ “Chinese Democracy” is a reality. The soft-drink maker said in March that it would give a free soda to everyone in America if the album dropped in 2008. “Chinese Democracy,” infamously delayed since recording began in 1994, goes on sale Sunday

“We never thought this day would come,” Tony Jacobs, Dr Pepper’s vice president of marketing, said in a statement. “But now that it’s here, all we can say is: The Dr Pepper’s on us.”

Beginning Sunday at 12:01 a.m., coupons for a free 20-ounce soda will be available for 24 hours on Dr Pepper’s Web site. They’ll be honored until Feb. 28.

13
Oct

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Money, Tech

I’ve been looking for a REAL shredder for quite a while. Something better than the 129$ disposable one you find at Office Heaven.  This thing is giant, a real monster.  It sucks in pages, staples, paperclips, whatever.  It spits it out in very tiny confetti. Its impressive to watch.  Usually when you buy one of these, you are out about $2200.00  Yes, a price greater than my first 3 cars, COMBINED.

Price for someone that watches closely on eBay: $29.00

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29
Sep

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Money, Solar Power

Just a note of interest.  Solar power purchases are exempt from Florida Sales Tax

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20
Sep

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Just plain weird, Money

Man Sucessfully Used a $200 bill

HALIFAX COUNTY:  North Carolina cops are searching for a guy who successfully passed a $200 bill bearing George W. Bush’s portrait and a drawing of the White House complete with lawn signs reading “We like ice cream” and “USA deserves a tax cut.” The phony Bush bill was presented to a cashier at a Food Lion in Roanoke Rapids on September 6 by an unidentified male who was seeking to pay for $150 in groceries. Remarkably, the cashier accepted the counterfeit note and gave the man $50 change. In a separate incident involving a different perp, Roanoke Rapids cops Tuesday arrested Michael Harris, 24, for attempting last month to pass an identical $200 Bush bill at a convenience store.

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