Archive for the ‘Guns’ Category

31
Aug

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Guns

While at the range today, my 10/22 had a ton of mag issues.  Seemed like there was no spring pressure left.  Didn’t have a 9/64th allen with me to open them but by the time I got home they seemed better.

 

Just in case you wondered how they are built, its pretty simple.

 

When putting it back together, you need to tighten the cap nut at least 6 steps for it to work well.

 

2
Oct

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Guns

The single most important thing for you to understand is that while the vast majority of guns in the hands of Americans are never used to kill or hurt another human being, they are indeed designed for that purpose. And though we target shoot or hunt, we will ultimately acknowledge that. Well, most of us. I don’t really want to pretend to speak for everyone but there are other gun owners here who will probably agree with what I am saying:

For gun owners, the context is important.

One gun is found in a desk drawer by a child, who kills his little brother with it in a deplorable gun accident.

One gun is used to shoot a fascist in Spain, in defense of a village.

One gun is used by a pregnant woman to kill a carjacker.

One gun is used to kill a rival drug dealer on the street.

One gun is used by a radical leftist political group who shoots an armored car guard.

One gun is used to shoot that same leftist political group down when they take hostages and begin firing at police.

One gun is used by a hiker who is attacked by a bear in Alaska.

One gun is negligently discharged and kills another hunter.

One gun is used to kill a home invader, who is in turn armed himself, with an intent to rape one of the residents.

For those who oppose guns, or hate guns, all guns are one thing: killing.

To gun owners, context is everything – that is to say, defense of innocent human life from one who tries to violate another’s right to life (and/or liberty).

As a gun owner, I consider the blanket rejection of guns to be simplistic and, without being overly strident, infantile. It would be nice to live in a world without violence. I do not believe that disarming people who are responsible, who would never initiate a criminal or violent act against another person, will do anything to serve this goal. It is odd to me that so many of those who most despise the State – the US government, would turn around and at the same time insist that only this same government be allowed to own arms, to the exlusion of responsible citizens. To me that indicates a contempt for one’s fellow man and a bizarre, childlike faith in the government. What are agents of the government? Men and women – just like civilians.

We who you will find online arguing in favor of the Right are not gang members. We are not criminals. We are not, for the most part anyway, Travis Bickle wannabes, lying in wait, hoping we have a chance to use our weapons on someone.

We believe that guns equalize good people and bad people. We believe they are a disincentive to bully and victimze other people. We believe their presence in prudent and judicious hands are a deterrent.

Most of us believe in caustic, malevolent evil – which almost always comes armed. Most of us believe in the right to defend the life one oneself and other innocent people against that evil.

If you want to really understand American gun owners, you will first have to understand that “gun culture” is not one thing – the inner city streets and the Second Amendment crowd almost never meet – they are two completely separate worlds. That is something those who hate guns and gun owners refuse to see, more than anything else.

For this reason and the reasons stated above, we do not view guns or gun ownership as a single thing: we abhor the decontextualization of gun ownership and resent the way we are stereotyped or lumped in with psychopaths and criminals, where the use of a firearm in self defense is grouped in the mind of some anti-gun people as the same thing as cold blooded murder.

We see a gun as a neutral, inanimate object, until it is picked up by a sentient human being.

We support the right to keep and bear arms because we believe the good guys ought to be armed, if not in numbers and firepower superior to, then at least at parity with criminals, and, god forbid, a tyrannical government run amok.

As those who believe we ought not to be armed should basically surrender to any armed criminal believe we live in a fantasy world when we assert that fighting back is not only our right, but is the prudent thing to do, we look with equal disbelief at those who think we should take the word of armed criminals that if we just cooperate, everything will be just fine.

We believe this because we believe in the right to one’s own life, and the means to defend that life. That is really all it comes down to. We do not believe that it is privilege granted by the State. We do not believe we have any obligation to seek consent from others to own weapons. We believe it is a right all men and women have, and would have, whether the US Constitution enumerated it in the Second Amendment or not.

(Again, if any gun owners disagree, I’m arguing for my camp, not necessarily for every gun owner. Feel free to downvote me if you think I’m way off base – these are the reasons I believe in gun ownership.)

Incidentally, as for background checks: I am theoretically for denying firearms to those who would misuse them for criminal intent. 100% for it, but with the caveat that any such regulations are not used to register (thereby enabling confiscation of) firearms or otherwise alert the government as to who has guns and who does not have guns.

There were those who supported the NICS background check because records of those checks were supposed to be destroyed after a certain time – that is, the government was supposed to destroy records, having been run on law abiding citizens, after a certain period.

Guess what happened?

The State simply cannot serve as a clearinghouse for the very means by which – theoretically speaking – the State is supposed to be challenged and destroyed, in the event of tyranny, which “more reasonable, non paranoid” people (their kind of terms) say can’t happen here….

19
Aug

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Guns

Two robbers in Milwaukee picked the wrong store to rob.

Police say that 2 robbers, wearing masks and gloves entered a Milwaukee food store this morning at 10:45AM and announced that they were going to commit a robbery.  One or two customers then opened fire, hitting both robbers.  One robber died on the spot, and the other robber escaped a short distance down the street before dying from his wounds.  Police say that both suspects, whose names have not yet been released, had lengthy criminal records for armed robbery, weapons, and drug related crimes.

12
Jul

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Guns

 

A Waukegan man is in stable condition after being shot by the store owner he is charged with robbing.

Lake County Assistant State’s Attorney Patricia Fix said officials are reviewing the details of the Sunday night shooting of Demitrius Newbill, 29. Newbill, who was shot in the chest, is at Vista East Medical Center.

Fix said Newbill, of the 500 block of Poplar Street, entered the Pasteleria Panaderia, 701 Yeoman St., about 8:15 p.m. The owner of the bakery told police Newbill had his left hand under his shirt and asked for a piece of paper and a pencil, Fix said.

Newbill wrote a note that said: “I have a gun. Give me all the money,” and handed it to the owner, Fix said.

The owner gave Newbill all the cash in the register, Fix said, and told police he believed he saw a gun in Newbill’s waistband as he did so.

Newbill then took the business telephone and cell phones from the owner and his employees, Fix said, and began backing toward the door of the store.

The owner told police he thought he saw Newbill reaching for the object in his waistband as he neared the door, so he took a .38 caliber revolver from underneath the counter and fired three times.

Police interviewed Newbill at the hospital, Fix said, and he admitted the robbery and that he told the store owner he had a gun.

Newbill, who was unarmed, has been charged with aggravated robbery and faces up to 15 years in prison if convicted.

Fix said police reports and witness statements are being reviewed to determine if anyone else will be charged.

The store owner has a current state firearm owner’s identification card, Fix said.

Court records show Newbill was convicted of robbery in 2003 and placed on probation, but he was found in violation of the probation and resentenced to five years in prison.

12
Jul

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Guns

A gunman who had wounded a shopkeeper and opened fire on several customers was stopped yesterday when another man shot him at the store in South Richmond, authorities said.

The violent attempted robbery took place shortly after 1 p.m. at the Golden Food Market at 2701 Jefferson Davis Highway, the same store where another man was shot last month — and only three blocks from the scene of another robbery in June that left a shopkeeper dead.

Owners of as many as a dozen Jefferson Davis-area businesses flocked to the scene of the shooting, and many were rattled by such a brazen daylight attack, said Councilwoman Reva Trammell, whose 8th District includes the Jefferson Davis corridor.

Trammell, who arrived outside the store shortly after yesterday’s shootings, described a frenzied scene. One man told Trammell that the man who had shot the robber was a guardian angel.

“Whoever did it probably saved their lives in there,” Trammell said of the shooter.

Police did not identify anyone involved in yesterday’s shootings.

The man who shot the robber is a friend of the store owner, and he was wearing a holster with a Western-style revolver, said Managing Deputy Commonwealth’s Attorney Tracy Thorne-Begland.

After the suspect shot the store owner and opened fire on patrons, the owner’s friend shot the suspect once in the torso, took his gun and called police, Thorne-Begland said.

Thorne-Begland said it appeared that the shooting of the suspect was justified, although he emphasized that the investigation was in the early stages.

Police said they expect to file charges against the suspect.

The store owner’s injuries did not appear life-threatening, authorities said, but the gunman’s injuries were said to be life-threatening. No one else was hurt.

Anthony Gregory, who lives near Golden Food, said he was in the store about 15 minutes before the shootings, and that while he was there, he saw a man with a baby making a purchase.

Gregory said the owner told the baby, “Welcome to the world. This is a dangerous world, so be careful. But don’t worry, God will protect you.”

Police Cmdr. Steve Drew said officers had been patrolling up and down Jefferson Davis yesterday and recently have bolstered their presence in the area. He said it was unusual for a commercial robbery to happen so early in the day.

The previous shooting at Golden Food took place late the night of June 12. And three nights earlier, a co-owner of the Come and Go Food Market, which is about three blocks north of Golden Food on Jefferson Davis, was shot and killed in a robbery.

Authorities said it was too early to know whether any of the three shootings on Jefferson Davis are connected.

A few hours after yesterday’s shootings, Said “Sam” Messaf, the man who was shot June 12 at Golden Food, was at the store to help another man shut down the market.

Messaf described how he had been helping out at the store June 12 when two robbers came inside. One man opened fire, reaching over the counter and shooting as Messaf cowered behind it, he said. Messaf was shot six times in his legs.

He said he suffered nerve damage in his left leg and has trouble sleeping.

Trammell said residents and business owners were scared by the recent violence but have faith that police are doing their best to stop it.

“I’m still shook up,” Trammell said. “I’m not afraid, but we’ve worked so hard on Jefferson Davis — so hard in that area to bring crime down.”



Contact Reed Williams at (804) 649-6332 or rwilliams@timesdispatch.com .

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10
Jul

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Guns

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Firearms Freedom Act Introduced in Florida

 

Introduced in the Florida House on July 6, 2009, the “Firearms Freedom Act” (HB-21) seeks to provide “that specified firearms, firearm accessories, and ammunition for personal use manufactured in state are not subject to federal law or regulation” in the State of Florida.

The bill is sponsored by Florida State Reps O’Toole and Plakon.  They follow in the path of Montana, and Tennessee who have already passed such legislation.  And they join with Utah, Texas, South Carolina and others who are considering it in an effort to limit federal regulation of guns, and specifically invoke the 9th and 10th Amendments as restrictions on federal power:

“the regulation of intrastate commerce is vested in the states under the ninth and tenth amendments to the United States Constitution, particularly if not expressly preempted by federal law. Congress has not expressly preempted state regulation of intrastate commerce pertaining to the manufacture on an intrastate basis of firearms, firearms accessories, and ammunition”

Read the full text of the legislation below:

A bill to be entitled An act relating to regulation of firearms; creating s. 790.34, F.S.; creating the Florida Firearms Freedom Act; providing a short title; providing legislative findings; providing definitions; providing that specified firearms, firearm accessories, and ammunition for personal use manufactured in the state are not subject to federal law or regulation; providing that the importation into the state of specified parts and the incorporation of such parts into a firearm, firearm accessory, or ammunition manufactured in the state does not subject the firearm, firearm accessory, or ammunition to federal regulation; providing that certain basic materials are not subject to federal regulation of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition under interstate commerce; providing that specified firearm accessories imported into the state from another state do not subject a firearm to federal regulation under interstate commerce; providing legislative findings with respect thereto; providing exceptions; providing applicability; requiring that firearms manufactured and sold in the state must bear an indicia of manufacture by a specified date; providing an effective date.

Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:

Section 1. Section 790.34, Florida Statutes, is created to read:

790.34 Florida Firearms Freedom Act.–
(1) SHORT TITLE.–This section may be cited as the “Florida Firearms Freedom Act.”

(2) LEGISLATIVE FINDINGS.–

(a) The Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution guarantees to the states and their citizens all powers not granted to the Federal Government elsewhere in the constitution and reserves to the State of Florida and its citizens certain powers as they were understood at the time that Florida was admitted to statehood in 1845. The guaranty of those powers is a matter of contract between the State of Florida and the citizens thereof and the United States as of the time that the compact with the United States was agreed upon and adopted by Florida and the United States in 1845.

(b) The regulation of intrastate commerce by the Ninth Amendment to the United States Constitution guarantees to the people rights not granted in the constitution and reserves to the State of Florida and its citizens certain rights as they were understood at the time that Florida was admitted to statehood in 1845. The guaranty of those powers is a matter of contract between the State of Florida and the citizens thereof and the United States as of the time that the compact with the United States was agreed upon and adopted by Florida and the United States in 1845. 52

(c) The regulation of intrastate commerce is vested in the states under the Ninth Amendment and the Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, particularly if not expressly preempted by federal law. Congress has not expressly preempted state regulation of intrastate commerce pertaining to the intrastate manufacture of firearms, firearm accessories, and ammunition.

(d) The Second Amendment to the United States Constitution reserves to the people the right to keep and bear arms as that right was understood at the time that Florida was admitted to statehood in 1845. The guaranty of that right is a matter of contract between the State of Florida and its citizens and the United States as of the time that the compact with the United States was agreed upon and adopted by Florida and the United States in 1845.

(e) Section 8, Article I of the Florida Constitution clearly secures to the citizens of Florida, and prohibits government interference with, the right of individual Florida citizens to keep and bear arms. This constitutional protection remains unchanged from the original Florida Constitution, which was approved by Congress and the people of Florida, and the right exists as it was understood at the time that the compact with the United States was agreed upon and adopted by Florida and the United States in 1845.

(3) DEFINITIONS.–As used in this section:

(a) “Basic materials” means raw materials, including, but not limited to, unmachined steel and unshaped wood, used in the creation and manufacture of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition that have manufacturing or consumer product applications other than applications in the manufacture of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition.

(b) “Borders of Florida” means the boundaries of Florida as described in s. 1, Art. II of the Florida Constitution.

(c) “Firearm accessories” means items that are used in conjunction with or mounted on a firearm but are not essential to the basic function of a firearm, including, but not limited to, telescopic or laser sights, magazines, flash or sound suppressors, folding or aftermarket stocks and grips, speed-loaders, ammunition carriers, and lights for target illumination.

(d) “Generic and insignificant parts” includes, but is not limited to, springs, screws, nuts, and pins that may be used in the manufacture of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition but that have manufacturing or consumer product applications other than applications in the manufacture of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition.

(e) “Manufactured” means the creation of a firearm, a firearm accessory, or ammunition from basic materials for functional usefulness, including, but not limited to, forging, casting, machining, or any other processes used to form materials used in the creation of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition.

(4) FIREARMS, FIREARM ACCESSORIES, AND AMMUNITION FOR PERSONAL USE MANUFACTURED AND REMAINING IN FLORIDA NOT SUBJECT TO FEDERAL LAW OR REGULATION; LEGISLATIVE FINDINGS.

(a)1. It is the finding of the Legislature that a firearm, firearm accessory, or ammunition for personal use that is manufactured commercially or privately in Florida from basic materials without the inclusion of any significant parts imported from another state and that remains within the borders of Florida is not considered to have traveled in interstate commerce.

2. A firearm, firearm accessory, or ammunition that:
a. Is for personal use;
b. Is manufactured commercially or privately in Florida from basic materials without the inclusion of any significant parts imported from another state;
c. With respect to a firearm, has the words “Made in Florida” clearly stamped on a central metallic part of the firearm, such as the receiver or frame; and
d. Remains within the borders of Florida is not subject to federal law or federal regulation, including registration, under the authority of Congress to regulate interstate commerce.

(b)1. It is the finding of the Legislature that generic and insignificant parts that may be used in the manufacture of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition but that have manufacturing or consumer product applications other than applications in the manufacture of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition are not considered to be firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition.

2. The importation into the state of generic and insignificant parts that may be used in the manufacture of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition but that have manufacturing or consumer product applications other than applications in the manufacture of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition, and the incorporation of such parts into a firearm, firearm accessory, or ammunition manufactured in the state, does not subject the firearm, firearm accessory, or ammunition to federal regulation.

(c)1. It is the finding of the Legislature that basic materials, such as unmachined steel and unshaped wood, that may be used in the manufacture of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition but that have manufacturing or consumer product applications other than applications in the manufacture of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition are not considered to be firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition.

2. Basic materials, such as unmachined steel and unshaped wood, that may be used in the manufacture of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition but that have manufacturing or consumer product applications other than applications in the manufacture of firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition are not subject to congressional authority to regulate firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition under interstate commerce as if such basic materials were actually firearms, firearm accessories, or ammunition.

3. The authority of Congress to regulate interstate commerce in basic materials does not include the authority to regulate firearms, firearm accessories, and ammunition manufactured in the state from basic materials and that remain within the state.

(d) Firearm accessories that are imported into the state from another state and that are subject to federal regulation as being in interstate commerce do not subject a firearm to federal regulation under interstate commerce by virtue of being attached to or used in conjunction with a firearm in Florida.

(5) EXCEPTIONS.–This section does not apply to:

(a) A firearm that cannot be carried and used by one person.
(b) A firearm that has a bore diameter greater than 1 1/2 inches and that uses smokeless powder, rather than black powder, as a propellant.
(c) Ammunition with a projectile that explodes using an explosion of chemical energy after the projectile leaves the firearm.
(d) A firearm that discharges two or more projectiles with one activation of the trigger or other firing device.

(6) APPLICABILITY.–This section applies to firearms, firearm accessories, and ammunition described in subparagraph

(4)(a)2. that are manufactured in Florida after October 1, 2010, and remain within the state.

(7) FIREARMS MANUFACTURED IN FLORIDA; INDICIA OF MANUFACTURE REQUIRED.–Effective October 1, 2010, a firearm manufactured and sold in this state must have the indicia “Made in Florida” clearly stamped on a central metallic part of the firearm, such as the receiver or frame.

Section 2. This act shall take effect October 1, 2010.

30
May

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Guns

(AP) NASHVILLE, Tenn. – A person who legally possesses a gun would not have it seized during periods of martial rule under a proposal that has been signed into law by the governor.

The measure was signed by Gov. Phil Bredesen on Thursday and takes effect immediately.

Sponsors say martial rule is the same as martial law at the federal level. They say the law is necessary after law enforcement in New Orleans went door to door seizing weapons in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

Republican Sen. Jack Johnson of Brentwood, one of the sponsors, has said he doesn’t expect such behavior in Tennessee, but believes legislation should be in place just in case.

(Copyright 2009 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

25
May

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Guns

In just 3 months Americans bought enough guns to outfit the entire Chinese and Indian army’s combined.

“You cannot invade the mainland United States. There would be a rifle behind every blade of grass.” – Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto WWII

You also bought 1,529,635,000 rounds of ammunition in just the month of December 2008. Yeah that is right, that is Billion with a “B”. This number takes no accounting of reloading or reloaded ammunition.

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15
May

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Guns

CANDLER – Sheriff’s deputies say a 25-year-old Summerfield man accused of burglarizing a home didn’t get very far, as the homeowner retrieved his .45-caliber handgun and held the man at gunpoint until they arrived.


Click to enlarge

James Day
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MARION COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

Calvin Crews told deputies on Wednesday he was at his residence in the 10000 block of Southeast 108th Terrace Road when he heard someone calling his name. Crews said he looked outside and saw 25-year-old James Lazarus Wayne Day running toward a truck, according to a Marion County Sheriff’s Office report.

Crews said he got his gun and returned to the window. He said Day drove the truck up to the front porch, ran inside the home, went to a bedroom and removed a five-gallon jug that was filled with about $600 in change.

Crews then held the man at gunpoint and called deputies, according to the report. When they arrived, Crews came out of the home with his gun and told authorities what had happened.

Entering the home, deputies found Day kneeling on the floor next to the five-gallon jug of change. Day told them he went to Crews’ home to ask for a job. He said he had just stuck his head in the door when Crews pulled a gun on him.

Officials said Day used to work for Crews.

Day was then arrested and taken to the Marion County Jail where he was charged with residential burglary and grand theft.

15
May

   Posted by: RobPatton   in Guns

TAMPA, FL — A Tampa woman refused to be a carjacking victim when she was approached by an armed man who jumped into her car on Thursday.

The woman, who only wants to be identified as Adrianna, pulled out her own gun.  “I just leaned forward and punched him in the forehead with my gun,” she said.  The man “screamed like a girl and almost dropped his gun” as he ran away, she added.
Tampa Police have arrested one suspect so far in what they see as a pattern of carjackings.  A-Keem Carr was arrested on related charges, but two others are believed to be preying on motorists in the Westshore area.

So far, two carjackings and four attempted carjackings have occurred over the last two weeks.   In one case, a man from Land O’ Lakes was pumping gas when an armed suspect approached demanding the car keys.

The man refused because his 6-month-old son was still in his car seat and the suspect took off.

Another incident involved a woman who was closing her business when she was approached by an armed man who took her van.  Her credit cards were used at a business in St. Petersburg and the van was found later along 39th Street in St. Petersburg.  A. Keem Carr was charged in that crime.

Other carjacking attempts included a woman standing next to her car in the Regency Apartments when she was approached but she screamed and scared off the bandit.

Adrianna was pulling into the International Mall when the armed man jumped in her car.  She talked about defending herself.  “I didn’t want to have to shoot…anyway over a car.  But if it was going to be him or me…”

Tampa Police warn the suspects are becoming more aggressive and may be prone to violence.